Local Food Cultures and Socioeconomic Status as Social Determinants of Nutritional Health: Exploring Family Food Practices

About the Study

plates of food collage

About the Study
People living in different Canadian communities, and in different socioeconomic situations, have different health problems. These health differences may be linked to variations in health behaviours such as the foods people eat. We know that food habits differ between Canadians in different parts of the country, in rural versus urban areas, and by age, cultural group, education, and income. However, we do not have a good understanding of how and why these geographic and social differences cause differences in health behaviours.

We conducted a research study in 10 different Canadian communities to learn more about this. The communities involved were Halifax and Kings County in Nova Scotia, Vancouver and the District of Kent in British Columbia, South Edmonton and Athabasca in Alberta, Prince Edward County and Kingston in Eastern Ontario and the communities of Parkdale and Riverdale in the city of Toronto. We invited families with at least one teenager and one parent who were willing to participate, could converse in English, and had lived in one the above communities for at least 2 years.

The purpose of the study was to examine how local food cultures, socioeconomic status, and the family context interact to produce the everyday food practices of adolescents and their parents. The universities involved in this study are the University of British Columbia, the University of Alberta, the University of Toronto, Queen's University and Dalhousie University.

If you are interested in learning more about this research project, please use the links on the left of this page or use the Contact Form to send a note to the Research Coordinator.

Members of the research team: please log in or use the Contact Form to send a note to the Research Coordinator.

Family Food Practices Research Project

plates of food collage

About the Study
People living in different Canadian communities, and in different socioeconomic situations, have different health problems. These health differences may be linked to variations in health behaviours such as the foods people eat. We know that food habits differ between Canadians in different parts of the country, in rural versus urban areas, and by age, cultural group, education, and income. However, we do not have a good understanding of how and why these geographic and social differences cause differences in health behaviours.

We are conducting this research study in 10 different Canadian communities to learn more about this. The communities involved are Halifax and Kings County in Nova Scotia, Vancouver and the District of Kent in British Columbia, South Edmonton and Athabasca in Alberta, Prince Edward County and Kingston in Eastern Ontario and the communities of Parkdale and Riverdale in the city of Toronto. We are inviting families with at least one teenager and one parent who are willing to participate, can converse in English, and have lived in one of the above communities for at least 2 years.

The purpose of this study is to examine how local food cultures, socioeconomic status, and the family context interact to produce the everyday food practices of adolescents and their parents. The universities involved in this study are the University of British Columbia, the University of Alberta, the University of Toronto, Queen's University and Dalhousie University.

If you are interested in learning more about this research project, please use the links on the left of this page or use the Contact Form to send a note to the Research Coordinator.

Members of the research team: please log in or use the Contact Form to send a note to the Research Coordinator.

Syndicate content